FJowners.com

General Category => Introductions => Topic started by: Paul.1478 on September 28, 2018, 08:09:28 AM



Title: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on September 28, 2018, 08:09:28 AM
Hello,
new to the form and looking for advise. I have LOVED the FJ from the time it was an 1100. I always wanted one and the wife is giving me the green light. I have a GL1800, KLR650 and a 76RD400, so what's one more right?
what years should I stay away from?
what years are better?
anything special to look for when looking at one?
Looks for me, I love the blue and seems to be the later years.

Thanks for any suggestions.

Paul
Atlanta GA Area.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: balky1 on September 28, 2018, 12:27:40 PM
If you find a decent one, aim at 1988 and above. I think those were the years when they sorted out the second gear issue and removed the useless anti-dive (corect me if I'm wrong). Recently a couple of low mile FJs were mentioned here on the forum.
If you opt for 1987 or older, test the second gear when you go on a test ride. I think that is the worst issue that you can expect, but it is also fixable without any problems. Engines are practicaly eternal (but after a couple hundred thousand kilometers expect at least piston ring change). Some smaller things need to be changed if the PO didn't. Like brake lines. Often they won't start or run poorly if were sitting for a longer time. Mostly just a carb clean and synch together with valve adjustment is needed (in opposite order).
So, welcome to the forum and browse the Maintenance and Running problems sections to get a better idea what to expect.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: FJmonkey on September 28, 2018, 12:45:57 PM
Color can be changed. The fairing grew (and other changes) over the 4 generations.
84/85 have the sleeker sport look.

86/87 rounded out a little but still a sleek sporty look. As mentioned by Balky the have the potential for the 2nd gear issue. The gear is fine, the shift fork bends and then allows 2nd gear to pop in and out like a rev-limiter under hard load/throttle.

89/90 started looking more sport touring and the Anti-Dive forks went away. They also sported a 17" front wheel so modern radials can be fitted. Dog bones were also used so changing the ride height after upgrading the rear wheel to 17' can be done with ease.

91+ A bit more wind protection and the most sought after feature is the rubber mounted engine. The smoothest as reported by anyone that ever rode one.

Many tend to favor the first one they owned but some have changed loyalty to the smoothness of the 91+.

They are all great machines that can be upgraded to modern standards for less than a new bike. They are also easy to work on if you like to maintain your own machines.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on September 28, 2018, 01:29:29 PM
Thanks Guys! I did see the on in ATL, I send a PM and waiting for reply, it was really what I was looking for and the right price.
good to know all years are good and not any big issues. I will keep looking but if anyone in a few hundred miles is looking to sell... I am willing to drive for the right bike. I only rode one once, when I was on vacation in Thailand they had a 1100 I rented for the day.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on September 28, 2018, 02:36:52 PM
well the guys with the add on the form replied to my PM, he still has it. Hoping to go look early next week. it would be nice to find something l like so close.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Sparky84 on September 28, 2018, 03:20:42 PM
G’day and Welcome Paul

Good luck with your purchase


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: red on September 28, 2018, 07:17:36 PM
Hello,
new to the form and looking for advise. I have LOVED the FJ from the time it was an 1100. I always wanted one and the wife is giving me the green light. I have a GL1800, KLR650 and a 76RD400, so what's one more right? what years should I stay away from?  anything special to look for when looking at one? Thanks for any suggestions.
Paul
Paul,

You will be happier on an FJ with 17" rims.  16" tires are hard to find now; you will have very few tire choices, to fit on 16" rims.  Everybody makes 17" M/C tires.

I would prefer any bike with the Anti-Lock Brake System.  ABS is somewhat available, and it's great, if it works.
.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Troyskie on September 28, 2018, 09:08:02 PM
G'day Paul,  :hi:.
Everyone has it right, all very good advice I should have followed before getting back into the FJ world.

Given your very nice stable, would it be fair to assume your fine with mechanicals?

As you've probably seen elsewhere on the forum there is pretty much nothing that can't be done to these bikes.

If you'd prefer the machine to perform, there are a metric tons of mods. Although the bikes are relatively simple, you can take them to some budget busting fun.

IMHO, for sporty, the 1100 is hard to beat (metric ton budget busting), but what balky, monkey and red say is spot on. For cruise with Iron Butt in mind (G'day Fred!), as the fellas said 91+.

Mechanically these bikes are long lasting and (most) engine parts are readily available. Some simple commodity type parts I shop around for, but for FJ specific bits I get in touch with Randy and Robert at RPM.

Any FJ you get, try and get one with good plastics. Honestly, the mechanicals are easier to get than the plastics.

Troyskie


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: ZOA NOM on September 29, 2018, 07:51:03 AM
'93  :)


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Tuned forks on September 29, 2018, 08:19:26 AM
I agree with everyone's advice.

I have a '90 with the mixed 16" and 17" wheels.  Definitely limits your tire choices unless you upgrade the wheels to all 17".

Owning two '90 Yamahas I can attest that the plastic bodywork is typically the toughest part to find in pristine condition and a real PITA to repair.

I too have wanted one of these motorcycles since they were new.  Now that I have one, finally, it's an addiction.  No know cure.  Enjoy! :good:


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Millietant on September 29, 2018, 12:46:49 PM
Mine is an '89 3CV, which I personally think is the best version to go for.

I've just recently swapped the front end for a FZR 1000 RU set up and put a 17" (YZF 600/Thundercat) rear wheel on it. This has let me have a big choice of tyres and the difference/improvement I have felt since switching to the new wheels and Bridgestone BT023 tyres (120/70 front and 170/60 rear) is brilliant - much more progressive turning into corners, more stable through corners and more predictable in left-right/right-left transitions. That's not to say it was bad before (it wasn't, it felt great), but it's noticeably better now.

BUT, no matter what year/model you get, it will be awesome, and there's a wealth of knowledge here to help with any issues you might encounter.  :good2: :good2:


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on September 30, 2018, 01:17:43 PM
All great advise and thank you all for taking the time to reply

I am going to see the 93 with 12k miles and abs tomorrow at noon.
Seems dumb to buy for fist one you look for but if as advertised this is just want I want.

So whose idea was it to put a 17 in front and 16 in back ?

Is there a rim that matches for front or do you need to buy a set?
Seems like a upgrade I want. That and an exasust system. They are way too quite stock. I don't want loud just a growl.

Paul


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on September 30, 2018, 01:35:49 PM
Well sorry. I checks the site and all info seems to be on the form. Should have checked first ..


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Millietant on September 30, 2018, 01:44:07 PM
LOL Paul, plenty of advice on here, but no need to change both wheels if you don't want to. It's down to personal choice really.

I wanted the USD forks so I used the matching FZR front wheel and many people prefer to use the FZR. Front wheel in the FJ forks.

But, I'd wanted the 17" rear wheel for a while and there are lots of easy swaps. I wanted to keep mybikes rear looking standard, with the brake caliper and torque arm above the swinging arm, so I used the 600 wheel and brake disc, with the FJ caliper and machined the 600 calliper carrier to get things aligned.

I love the difference it's all made to my bike and the way it steers/handles.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on October 01, 2018, 12:35:31 PM
OK, new official member. 93 with 12K miles.
it has some problems, from idle it bogs when you twist the throttle. the pervious owner put new brass in and larger pilot jets. I called RPM (who he got the new jets from) and they could not be nicer. took about 10 min to talk with me. I will just pull the crabs off and send to them for the 150 clean and check. I am sure that is it.
Brakes feel strange, think it needs a rebuilt master or the brake upgrade stops OK just feels.. well hard to explain.
super nice looking bike and past 3K, hold on..
Super excited.

Paul



Title: Re: New Member
Post by: ryanschoebel on October 01, 2018, 01:07:02 PM
Sounds like you got a good bike, and are going to have alot of fun! Keep us posted on any mods and changes you make!


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Millietant on October 01, 2018, 04:07:44 PM
OK, new official member. 93 with 12K miles.
it has some problems, from idle it bogs when you twist the throttle. the pervious owner put new brass in and larger pilot jets. I called RPM (who he got the new jets from) and they could not be nicer. took about 10 min to talk with me. I will just pull the crabs off and send to them for the 150 clean and check. I am sure that is it.
Brakes feel strange, think it needs a rebuilt master or the brake upgrade stops OK just feels.. well hard to explain.
super nice looking bike and past 3K, hold on..
Super excited.

Paul


Plenty of Gen1 FZ1/R1/YZF1000R blue spot front brake calipers for sale on eBay for not a lot of money  :good2:


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Tuned forks on October 01, 2018, 08:25:06 PM
and past 3K, hold on..
Super excited.

Paul



Wait until you grab a fist full of throttle and get past 5000.  Hint, hint, you'll learn what a kookaloo moment feels like.
Welcome to the addiction.

Joe


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: red on October 01, 2018, 08:35:02 PM
OK, new official member. 93 with 12K miles. it has some problems
Brakes feel strange, think it needs a rebuilt master or the brake upgrade stops OK just feels.. well hard to explain.
Paul
Paul,

Now I do not have a '93, but generically:  The old rubber brake hoses can be replaced with braided stainless steel hoses.  If you plan to use a fork brace, the Y-splitter in the hose assembly can be in the way, so you can eliminate that part, if you wish, with two new hoses, one going to each caliper.  I believe RPM can set you up, or any decent hydraulic shop can make braided SS hoses (in colors) for you.  Braided SS hoses will probably be a significant brake upgrade, there.  Use the "new" front brakes with caution, at first.

I believe there is a bushing in the brake lever, that pushes the Master Cylinder rod.  You may have a badly worn bushing there (it is part of the MC rebuild kit), or if there is no bushing, you may need a new brake lever.  You might want an upgrade to aftermarket hand levers, then.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Pat Conlon on October 01, 2018, 09:20:17 PM
Very good Paul :good2:

You're in good hands with Robert and Randy. Did the previous owner (PO) have any service records?
The reason I ask is at 12k is a good time to check your valves.

[rant on]
I know what you mean on the weird feel of the ABS. I restored and rode Jason Lawson's '93 and I noticed the same thing. I wondered if the vague feel was from the 23 miles of rubber brake lines used on the ABS.
Squeeze the front brake lever past threshold, the ABS pump starts cycling and the rear brake pedal drops down, WTF is with that? Never figured that one out. What does the front brake have to do with the rear?
The FJ's don't used a linked front/back brake system, like Honda.
When I finished the resto on Jason's bike, new HH pads fully bedded, I took it out to my special secret test road and tested the ABS stopping distances at 30/60/80 mph. I compared those distances to my '92's non ABS bike (with monoblock blue spots /FZ-1 m/c and same HH pads) and found I could consistency stop quicker in a shorter distance with the '92 non ABS. This was on a dry clean road.
Of course ABS is a much safer system on wet pavement. No question. In a panic mode? Yes, it's safer.
[rant off]

With Jason's '93, we ended up with the front brakes non ABS (FZ-1/ blue spots/ SS lines) and kept the rear brake ABS.  That's the best. I liked the rear brake ABS. That was cool. I'm a clumsy galoot with the brake pedal. I have better control with my right hand working the lever at threshold than I will ever have with my right foot.

Anyhoo.... Enjoy that bike!
If you do decide to keep the ABS, replace the 23 miles of 30 year old rubber brake hoses with some SS lines.

Cheers.  Pat


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on October 02, 2018, 06:53:36 AM
No service records but the oil was just changed fork oil ect. new plugs. I plan on checking the valves when it is apart with Carbs to RPM to be cleaned. also going to run new brake fluid through the breaks and clutch. I know that goes bad and this is an old bike no matter the miles on it. I have seen some posting of what to do on a FJ and was planning on following this.

The front end is so soft it is almost dangerous. I added as much preload as the screws would let me but little change. I will check the spacers/sag, oil level. if this is all good I will need to order new springs from RPM and there valves.
my Goldwing was like this when I first go it, new springs and spacers made it a completely different bike but I hope I can resolve without spending too much.

Thanks all... Great bike, everything so far I thought it would be looking past the few minor issues.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Millietant on October 02, 2018, 07:26:36 AM
No service records but the oil was just changed fork oil ect. new plugs. I plan on checking the valves when it is apart with Carbs to RPM to be cleaned. also going to run new brake fluid through the breaks and clutch. I know that goes bad and this is an old bike no matter the miles on it. I have seen some posting of what to do on a FJ and was planning on following this.

The front end is so soft it is almost dangerous. I added as much preload as the screws would let me but little change. I will check the spacers/sag, oil level. if this is all good I will need to order new springs from RPM and there valves.
my Goldwing was like this when I first go it, new springs and spacers made it a completely different bike but I hope I can resolve without spending too much.

Thanks all... Great bike, everything so far I thought it would be looking past the few minor issues.

LOL Paul, go for the USD FZR 1000 front forks & wheel conversion with 320mm discs, better calipers, SS brake lines and 0.95 kg/m fork springs - if you're anything like me, you'll marvel at the difference (on braking I already had SS brake lines before I upgraded the whole front end, but the new discs, calipers and master cylinder have given a much more "forcefull" braking sensation, with better control/feel, and the front also dives less  :good2: :good2: under braking.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on October 04, 2018, 10:34:47 AM
well I get the bike sorted a bit. when I got it, I could not help notice how SOFT it was. I got air from a gas station, looked ok.
went home, all pre-load were softest settings. turned the forks and shock all the way up and the rebound all the way up, but was still flaky. it wanted to standup during the turns and just felt unsafe.
Then I got my tire gauge out, ok, note to self, gas station air, don't trust it! they were about 24 lbs each.
MUCH better, still stock but much better.
I am going to take the carbs off this weekend and send to RPM (it bogs with a quick twist at idle) and send them the forks. for 150 for the crab cleaning and 175 for the forks, for me, no brainer. I will have them change springs/seals and put the valves in.
I will check the valves while the bike is apart and see what I see. I notice a loud ticking but seem to be only on the left side and I have read that is something to do with the cam, normal and not an issue but no need not to at least take a look while it is apart.





Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Millietant on October 04, 2018, 12:42:27 PM
 :bad:

Not sure if it's standard advice or not, but I take out the the two top bolts holding the rear sub-frame to the bike frame and let it drop (slowly) onto a block of wood sitting on the tyre. This gives extra clearance to get the air box out easily.

When putting the carbs back on, I've made a "tool" out of a wire coat hanger to help ease/pull and stubborn carb rubbers into place between the inner carbs and the air box, where they don't immediately slide into place - saves a lot of time and messing about with flat screwdrivers.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: FJmonkey on October 04, 2018, 01:01:56 PM
Dropping the rear sub-frame is recommended. Warming up the rubber makes them a little softer as well.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on October 04, 2018, 01:07:40 PM
:bad:

Not sure if it's standard advice or not, but I take out the the two top bolts holding the rear sub-frame to the bike frame and let it drop (slowly) onto a block of wood sitting on the tyre. This gives extra clearance to get the air box out easily.

When putting the carbs back on, I've made a "tool" out of a wire coat hanger to help ease/pull and stubborn carb rubbers into place between the inner carbs and the air box, where they don't immediately slide into place - saves a lot of time and messing about with flat screwdrivers.

I have the Unipods on it. I hope this will be easy but if needed,  I will check for the sub frame. I assume it should be apparent when I am in there.
I have the stock airbox, what a monstrosity it is.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Millietant on October 04, 2018, 01:59:14 PM
Yep - it's defo obvious  :good2:


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Tuned forks on October 04, 2018, 05:36:21 PM
Paul, with the airbox out this is what things will look like.  Super easy to remove the carbs.  Removing the cables from the carb linkage is tough but you can separate the cables at the cable box. White plastic box located under the gas tank. Don't lose the little screws.  Might want to take a pic after you remove the cable box lid.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Pat Conlon on October 04, 2018, 06:25:06 PM
Removing the cables from the carb linkage is tough but you can separate the cables at the cable box. White plastic box located under the gas tank.....

Negative Joe. No cable splitter box on the '93's. Really a shame, it sure makes carb r/r a snap.
The '91-'93's have (2) 1 piece continuous cables from the carbs to the throttle.

What I do on those is to unhook the push/pull cables from the throttle tube, disconnect the cables from the throttle housing, and then pull the carbs off with with the cables attached.
It is much easier to disconnect (and reconnect) the push/pull cables on the carb linkage when you have the assembly on the bench.

Cheers


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Tuned forks on October 04, 2018, 07:11:35 PM
There I go showing my naivete again.

That's a serious bummer about no cable box.  Paul can pretty much ignore everything I wrote now.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: krusty on October 04, 2018, 07:47:25 PM
well I get the bike sorted a bit. when I got it, I could not help notice how SOFT it was. I got air from a gas station, looked ok.
went home, all pre-load were softest settings. turned the forks and shock all the way up and the rebound all the way up, but was still flaky. it wanted to standup during the turns and just felt unsafe.
Then I got my tire gauge out, ok, note to self, gas station air, don't trust it! they were about 24 lbs each.
MUCH better, still stock but much better.
I am going to take the carbs off this weekend and send to RPM (it bogs with a quick twist at idle) and send them the forks. for 150 for the crab cleaning and 175 for the forks, for me, no brainer. I will have them change springs/seals and put the valves in.
I will check the valves while the bike is apart and see what I see. I notice a loud ticking but seem to be only on the left side and I have read that is something to do with the cam, normal and not an issue but no need not to at least take a look while it is apart.




Re "flaky" handling. How old are the tyres?


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: ribbert on October 05, 2018, 04:37:48 AM
Removing the cables from the carb linkage is tough but you can separate the cables at the cable box. White plastic box located under the gas tank.....

Negative Joe. No cable splitter box on the '93's. Really a shame, it sure makes carb r/r a snap.
The '91-'93's have (2) 1 piece continuous cables from the carbs to fthe throttle.

What I do on those is to unhook the push/pull cables from the throttle tube, disconnect the cables from the throttle housing, and then pull the carbs off with with the cables attached.
It is much easier to disconnect (and reconnect) the push/pull cables on the carb linkage when you have the assembly on the bench.

Cheers

Pat, you're still making hard work of it.......

Rest the carbs near where they will be mounted and wedge them wide open (the screwdriver handle in the picture)....

(https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7599/16420821813_03d05bf459_c.jpg)

......this gives you heaps of slack inner cable (below), now fit the cables, remove the whatever is holding the carbs open and the cables will snap taught, then mount the carbs on the motor. This makes fitting them a breeze, not even any tools required, you can do it with your fingers.

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8712/16853438590_83df43f0e0_c.jpg)

It takes me 30 seconds max to fit both cables, without blood or bad language.

When I am shown, read about, hear of or discover a better way to do something it is imprinted on my mind instantly and forever. This is what's so frustrating about the forum, Someone can post handy hints, such as the one above which has been posted many times, and next week, month, whenever the question is asked again, it


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Motofun on October 05, 2018, 05:19:07 AM
For what it's worth....I print a copy of the picture and put it in my 3 ring binder (in this case under "carbs").  I usually take a quick tour through my book when I'm about to tackle a significant repair job just to jog my memory. 


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on October 05, 2018, 06:16:04 AM
well I get the bike sorted a bit. when I got it, I could not help notice how SOFT it was. I got air from a gas station, looked ok.
went home, all pre-load were softest settings. turned the forks and shock all the way up and the rebound all the way up, but was still flaky. it wanted to standup during the turns and just felt unsafe.
Then I got my tire gauge out, ok, note to self, gas station air, don't trust it! they were about 24 lbs each.
MUCH better, still stock but much better.
I am going to take the carbs off this weekend and send to RPM (it bogs with a quick twist at idle) and send them the forks. for 150 for the crab cleaning and 175 for the forks, for me, no brainer. I will have them change springs/seals and put the valves in.
I will check the valves while the bike is apart and see what I see. I notice a loud ticking but seem to be only on the left side and I have read that is something to do with the cam, normal and not an issue but no need not to at least take a look while it is apart.




Re "flaky" handling. How old are the tyres?

Hello,
it was due to LOW air pressure. they were at about 24 lbs. when I filled them to the correct pressure it was a totally different bike. tires are about 80% new.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on October 05, 2018, 06:19:57 AM
Removing the cables from the carb linkage is tough but you can separate the cables at the cable box. White plastic box located under the gas tank.....

Negative Joe. No cable splitter box on the '93's. Really a shame, it sure makes carb r/r a snap.
The '91-'93's have (2) 1 piece continuous cables from the carbs to fthe throttle.

What I do on those is to unhook the push/pull cables from the throttle tube, disconnect the cables from the throttle housing, and then pull the carbs off with with the cables attached.
It is much easier to disconnect (and reconnect) the push/pull cables on the carb linkage when you have the assembly on the bench.

Cheers

Pat, you're still making hard work of it.......

Rest the carbs near where they will be mounted and wedge them wide open (the screwdriver handle in the picture)....

(https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7599/16420821813_03d05bf459_c.jpg)

......this gives you heaps of slack inner cable (below), now fit the cables, remove the whatever is holding the carbs open and the cables will snap taught, then mount the carbs on the motor. This makes fitting them a breeze, not even any tools required, you can do it with your fingers.

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8712/16853438590_83df43f0e0_c.jpg)

It takes me 30 seconds max to fit both cables, without blood or bad language.

When I am shown, read about, hear of or discover a better way to do something it is imprinted on my mind instantly and forever. This is what's so frustrating about the forum, Someone can post handy hints, such as the one above which has been posted many times, and next week, month, whenever the question is asked again, it

this is great. Thank you. not sure if I would have thought of this or not. with the photos it makes it very easy to envision.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Pat Conlon on October 08, 2018, 12:38:45 PM
I've tied it you way Noel, many times. I like working on my bench.
Even with a soft wood dowel (never a hard plastic handle) I've seen throttle plates bend.

For me, my way is easier, besides it becomes a perfect time to lube my cables.
I do enjoy the ease of the '84-'90 splitter box.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: krusty on October 08, 2018, 08:19:13 PM
well I get the bike sorted a bit. when I got it, I could not help notice how SOFT it was. I got air from a gas station, looked ok.
went home, all pre-load were softest settings. turned the forks and shock all the way up and the rebound all the way up, but was still flaky. it wanted to standup during the turns and just felt unsafe.
Then I got my tire gauge out, ok, note to self, gas station air, don't trust it! they were about 24 lbs each.
MUCH better, still stock but much better.
I am going to take the carbs off this weekend and send to RPM (it bogs with a quick twist at idle) and send them the forks. for 150 for the crab cleaning and 175 for the forks, for me, no brainer. I will have them change springs/seals and put the valves in.
I will check the valves while the bike is apart and see what I see. I notice a loud ticking but seem to be only on the left side and I have read that is something to do with the cam, normal and not an issue but no need not to at least take a look while it is apart.




Re "flaky" handling. How old are the tyres?

Hello,
it was due to LOW air pressure. they were at about 24 lbs. when I filled them to the correct pressure it was a totally different bike. tires are about 80% new.
I have a GL1500 with tyres that are about 90% BUT they are 11 years old. They handle good in the dry but there's no way I would trust them on a wet road. I have replacements ready to go on when I get home from vacation. (Not looking forward to changing the rear)


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: red on October 08, 2018, 10:29:19 PM
Hello,
it was due to LOW air pressure. they were at about 24 lbs. when I filled them to the correct pressure it was a totally different bike. tires are about 80% new.
I have a GL1500 with tyres that are about 90% BUT they are 11 years old. They handle good in the dry but there's no way I would trust them on a wet road. I have replacements ready to go on when I get home from vacation. (Not looking forward to changing the rear)
Sorry, guys,

Tread depth is no good indication of tire age or reliability, IMHO.  Click the link, and scroll down . . .

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=11 (https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=11)

For these strong and heavy bikes, it may be getting-nervous time when a tire is maybe 5~7 years old.  Your call, sure, but an old tire can fail very badly, and maybe suddenly. 

I got my FJ on old tires with good deep tread.  I wanted to wear down the tread more before I got new tires, but I locked the rear wheel once too often, and so I tossed them.  New Pirellis made my bike a whole new machine.


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: ribbert on October 09, 2018, 07:22:21 AM

..... I've seen throttle plates bend.


I had assumed a level of competency commensurate with removing the carbies, I can't even comprehend how so much force could be applied as to bend the plates by propping them open.

Anyway, to each their own, if you like doing it on the bench so be it but circumstances don't always allow for such a leisurely and controlled process nor warrant making it any more work than it needs to be.

Just as well we're all different, eh Pat?

Noel


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: ribbert on October 09, 2018, 07:54:11 AM

..... I've seen throttle plates bend.


I had assumed a level of competency........

Noel

It has just been pointed out to me that there are folks here who might think I was referring to Pat, I wasn't, I was referring to whoever was responsible for the bent plates he has seen.

We don't want any misunderstanding.

Noel


Title: Re: New Member
Post by: Paul.1478 on October 28, 2018, 08:02:48 AM
I got my carbs back from RPM Thursday.
Took the day off to put them on and finish up the bike.
Added the 2 required shims. New valve cover casket new rubber for valve cover bolts.
New brake pads ect.
Thanks for the above on cable install it would have been a disaster without it. Still not easy
Took the bike for a ride to the north GA mountians for a 300 mile ride.
Carbs as you all know. Perfect. No flat spot. The bike handles well through the twisties and really is fast in the straights. New suspension and tires is going to make the twisties better.
Bike was more than I thought it was for all these years of wanting one.