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General Category => FJ Project Writeups => Topic started by: Urban_Legend on August 20, 2019, 06:45:04 PM



Title: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on August 20, 2019, 06:45:04 PM
Last night i took delivery of my "new" 92 FJ project bike. It has come to me as a bit of a jigsaw puzzle (or Ikea Flat Pack version).
I bought it off a fellow member (Thanks XRay) who had it in his shed to fix but never quite got around to it.

The current plan, subect to change without notice, is to make her shinny again with minimal mods (except for common sense ones of course)
She will need some loving. First step is to see what is missing, then strip down to a bare frame.

I just wish the AU to US dollar rate was better than $0.62. Makes it real hard to get stuff from RPM.

Updates to follow.

Mark


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Tuned forks on August 20, 2019, 08:41:07 PM
Congratulations Mark.  We are in the same boat.  I just bought a '93 last weekend from a forum member.  It's painted the same scheme as yours.  Never know, we might end up comparing notes.

Joe


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on August 27, 2019, 07:24:23 AM
I have started on pulling down the 92 (yet to be named). She got a pressure wash (hate working on dirty vehicles), then into the shed for the tear down. I don't actually have a budget for this build, but wanting to keep it far less the the Sparkles (my 84 FJ) build. Here are few of the pics.

Mark


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Sparky84 on August 28, 2019, 02:45:05 AM
Looking good Mr Mark.

At least you won’t have to worry about the “budget” blowing out  (popcorn)

Are you fitting a big bore kit with blower  :music:?


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on August 28, 2019, 03:09:59 AM
Thought a supercharged 1350 would be nice with full thunderace running gear, and instead of painting use gold wrap. Just keeping it all very understated.  :rofl2:


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Pat Conlon on August 28, 2019, 12:03:45 PM
Nice project Mark!  Good on ya for putting her together, kudos!

Have you ever ridden a 4th gen rubber mounted FJ?  You are in for a treat.
Much more smooth than our 1st gen FJ’s.


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Tuned forks on August 28, 2019, 03:58:26 PM
So Pat, I am in for a change when I get Paul's '93 running, compared to my '90?

Joe


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on August 28, 2019, 04:00:17 PM
Thanks Pat

No I hanvn't ridden a 4th Gen yet. Looking forward to it though. I have already sourced a few replacement bits for it, and I am getting the rear shock rebuilt by a motocycle suspension specialist in brisbane. He has already done a few members shocks and his rates are very reasonable.

Mechanically the bike seems in good conditions, so its mostly cosmetic stuff that needs fixing up.
I will replace all the wheel and head stem bearings and the brake lines to bring her up to standard and down the track i would like to get some panniers and top box (dont care if itsGivi or Hepco Becker).


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Pat Conlon on August 28, 2019, 07:14:10 PM
So Pat, I am in for a change when I get Paul's '93 running, compared to my '90?

Joe

I think so Joe.
Your 1990 was the last year of the Gen 3 FJ’s and so  ‘91 was the first year for gen 4’s and IMO there is a distinct improvement in the reduction of engine vibrations due to the motor mount design.
Lube up those front bushings, adjust the valves and sync the carbies and I bet you’ll feel the difference.

FYI Gen 1 = ‘84/85;  Gen 2 = ‘86/87; Gen 3 = ‘88/89/90; Gen 4 = ‘91/92/93/94/95


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Pat Conlon on August 28, 2019, 07:23:58 PM
Thanks Pat

No I hanvn't ridden a 4th Gen yet. Looking forward to it though. I have already sourced a few replacement bits for it, and I am getting the rear shock rebuilt by a motocycle suspension specialist in brisbane. He has already done a few members shocks and his rates are very reasonable.

Mechanically the bike seems in good conditions, so its mostly cosmetic stuff that needs fixing up.
I will replace all the wheel and head stem bearings and the brake lines to bring her up to standard and down the track i would like to get some panniers and top box (dont care if itsGivi or Hepco Becker).

Yes, a proper back shock is #1 on my mod list, the most expensive mod but the most effective.
Heavier front springs are also necessary. Those oem springs were soft the day the bike left Japan.
If you can do fork valves, good, if not at least get a set of progressive springs.
Of course, change those brake lines. I don’t consider that to be a modification but a maintenance item.
A set of RPM Vibranators on the bars help diminish the high frequency tingles.

Yep, I really noticed the smoothness along with the better wind protection vs my ‘84
I think the 1991 and 1992 Non ABS FJ’s are the pick of the litter.  I am not a fan of the FJ ABS.

Cheers Mark....take lots of pictures for us....makes my heart glad to see you do this.  Pat


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on August 28, 2019, 07:48:53 PM
At least I know what I am in for this time. This is my second FJ resurrection from the dead. And this 92 is in way better condition than my 84 when I started on it. Trying to thak photos of all wire routing as it is different to the 84 in some places. There will be plenty of progress photos too.

Mark


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: aviationfred on August 29, 2019, 12:11:12 AM
Mark,

Also take this into account. You have been riding the FJ with the smallest fairing, the new to you 1200 has the largest fairing. I have found that for year round riding, multiple windscreens are a must. At the present time I have 4 different windscreens for my 4th gen. For the hottest summer days, I use the OEM standard windscreen. I believe that MRA offers an actual smaller than OEM windscreen. https://www.twistedthrottle.com/mra-spoilerscreen-windshield-for-yamaha-fj1200-91. (https://www.twistedthrottle.com/mra-spoilerscreen-windshield-for-yamaha-fj1200-91.) I have the OEM finned windscreen that I use for Summer touring. Deflects a bit more air, but still works well with a cool vest at highway speeds. I have the regular MRA Touring windscreen that I have been using mostly for riding in the colder temps. It works very well and blocks the air flow from my torso. I just recently picked up a Powerbronze flip windscreen. I have ridden with it for only a few days. I had to remove it because it is so large and the days were to hot. This windscreen is very tall and blocks a lot of wind.

Photos are in order as mentioned.


Fred


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on August 29, 2019, 01:01:15 AM
Thanks Fred. Sounds advice. I have the screen in the second picture, and was thinking of getting a lower, more sport oriented screen. Any of them would offer more protection than the 84 power bronze screen.


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on August 31, 2019, 07:08:07 PM
Not quite a mated set. But time and money will get it there.
I have sourced some spare bits for it for just in case. 1200 gauges and dash surround, switch blocks, silver spot callipers. Also got a tool trolley to make life a bit easier and trying to get a bike lift to save me from working on the floor.
Fun times


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on September 13, 2019, 11:59:55 PM
I got around to pulling a bit more off the 92 today. I was hoping to get it to a bare frame, but my trolley jack is broken and I wasn't going to lift it by myself.
I am getting a nice pile of parts in one corner and a hoarders nest of new bits on my shelves.

I am thinking I will get the frame and associated bits sand blasted and professionally painted., then I can start on the rebuilding task.


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: ribbert on September 14, 2019, 08:10:24 AM
I got around to pulling a bit more off the 92 today. I was hoping to get it to a bare frame, but my trolley jack is broken and I wasn't going to lift it by myself.
I am getting a nice pile of parts in one corner and a hoarders nest of new bits on my shelves.

I am thinking I will get the frame and associated bits sand blasted and professionally painted., then I can start on the rebuilding task.

Mark, have you considered rattle can paint on the exposed bits of the frame, after all, there's not much of it and the goal is to end up with a flash looking bike that's great to ride, not a concours garage queen.
I guarantee you couldn't pick my frame from a stripped and professionally painted one and who looks that closely. If you are going to use the bike regularly, how long will the bits you can't see look good for anyway?

There are plenty of things that would enhance the ride and the look that would be better bang for buck (IMO)
You might even decide some (or all) of the frame looks better black. There are some excellent examples of such bikes out there, the one below has my favourite, the front rails painted out, I think it looks way better. To me, those down tubes really look like a retro engineered after thought from a length of re-purposed scaffolding, they don't flow.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/318/19209874731_375412e5c2_b.jpg)

Anyway, whatever makes you happy is the right choice, just as long as you've given some thought to it.

You asked a while back if anyone knew of a lift table for sale not too far away, yeah, working on the floor sucks. I know you're a handy man on the tools, why don't you knock yourself up a timber bench and get yourself a mechanics stool, they're not very expensive ($60 SCA) and far more useful than you would imagine.

When I started work in the late 60's lift tables hadn't been invented, not even for workshops and timber benches and ramps were a common sight (so was working on your knees on concrete all day). As there was no such purpose built item, the benches were commonly made by the mechanics from timber bike crates. (work places were different back then) Anything was better than working on the floor, crouched over or lying down on the concrete. It doesn't need to be flash, just sturdy.

You know Mark, you could probably have a brand new hydraulic /pneumatic lift table delivered to your door for the cost of the frame strip and paint!

Whatever you end up doing, it's a great project and you've previously shown you have skill to do it. Do we get to see it at the rally?

Preaching to the converted here, but even after 220k recreational km's over the last 10 years, the magnificence of the FJ is always a conscious thought whenever I ride it.  I will sometimes take it to the local shops for milk and bread simply because I haven't ridden it for a few days and miss it.

The RT does everything better but it's just not an FJ!

Not wishing to start a model war here but, you're gonna love that thing when you get it on the road Mark.


Noel


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on September 14, 2019, 06:49:22 PM
Great insight there Noel. I was originally going to rattle can paint the frame, but there is some rust forming in places that make normal sanding hard. At least if it's stripped back to bare metal and painted properly, I don't have to worry about it.

My 84 has a black frame, which seems to make it disappear. I do like the look of the 3xw you pictured.

The lift table is a luxury that I thought would be nice, but not essential. I built the 84 in a she a quarter of the size than the one I have now.

Now the the 92 is nearly completely stripped, I could put it back together on a raised platform.
Hopefully this one won't have the electrical gremlins the Sparkles has.

I don't think I will have it ready for the next rally, as this is a much more budget oriented build. And I don't have a Triumph Daytona to sell this time to fund my impatience.


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on September 14, 2019, 09:16:00 PM
OK brains trust. I have found a crack in the frame of the 92. Can these be safely welded? It is o. The join of the bottom portion of the upper rail. Near where the foot plates bolt on.


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: X-Ray on September 14, 2019, 09:56:45 PM
Ahhh bugger Mark! I’m thinking that could be cleaned up and Mig or Tig welded back to good as new. Will be good to check all of the frame and find someone who can do the repair to a safe standard. Read a few cases of FZ6 frames cracking on the Aussie forums, and some were rewelded with a plate also welded over the repair, so it can be done.


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Tuned forks on September 14, 2019, 10:12:35 PM
Mark, as X-Ray stated the frame can be welded.  However it will likely need to be gusseted or it will crack again.  You'll need the services of a welder that is knowledgeable in automotive welding.  The inside of the frame might also have substantial rust if water has been leeching into the frame.  Might be worth drilling a drain hole wherever you think water would congregate.  There are so many FJ's being parted out here in the states that I have to wonder, wouldn't it be feasible to find another frame in Australia?  I am aware you might have registration difficulties with a different VIN sequence.

Joe


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: T Legg on September 15, 2019, 12:09:49 AM
I would think it could be repaired but it looks like the part below the crack is smaller than the piece above.Im guessing the lower section was inserted into the upper section then welded at the factory so there may be a piece of the lower tubing broken inside of the upper  tubing


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on September 15, 2019, 12:56:27 AM
The crisis may have been averted with Diesel Dave coming to the rescue with a frame, only a few months difference in build dates.

Only have to get it from Sydney to Grafton, but hoping that XRay be able to help with that on his way back from Troyski's shed day.


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: ribbert on September 15, 2019, 04:19:21 AM
Mark, no biggy, it doesn't need gussetting or reinforcing, the bead of weld is all it needs. In fact, the welded frame is probably stronger than an uncracked one as it appears to be a flaw in some of them.

The best FJ in the country (the owner may not wish his bike to be identified) cracked there many years and several hundred thousand km's ago and remains perfect to this day with just a single bead of weld.

Must be a bit of a weakness. Relatively, I don't see that many FJ's but I've repaired a couple of those cracks in that exact spot. In both cases it was the LHS but I welded both.

OK everyone, out with your torches and off to the garage...... :biggrin:

Noel


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Sparky84 on September 15, 2019, 04:28:43 AM

OK everyone, out with your torches and off to the garage...... :biggrin:

Noel

I’ll bring my Torch to Nowra in a couple of weeks  :good:



Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: ribbert on September 15, 2019, 04:52:48 AM

OK everyone, out with your torches and off to the garage...... :biggrin:

Noel

I’ll bring my Torch to Nowra in a couple of weeks  :good:



Err....Alan, that would be next week!

Noel


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Sparky84 on September 15, 2019, 05:15:46 AM

OK everyone, out with your torches and off to the garage...... :biggrin:

Noel

I’ll bring my Torch to Nowra in a couple of weeks  :good:



Err....Alan, that would be next week!

Noel

I don't think so Noel,
(well I hope not)



Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: ribbert on September 15, 2019, 06:34:59 AM

OK everyone, out with your torches and off to the garage...... :biggrin:

Noel

I’ll bring my Torch to Nowra in a couple of weeks  :good:



Err....Alan, that would be next week!

Noel

I don't think so Noel,
(well I hope not)



After a mild panic I checked. The manshed is 27th-29th Sept. Friday this week is the 20th and next week the 27th.

That makes sense to me but I'm still a tad worried. Have I got the right year dates?

Noel


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Troyskie on September 16, 2019, 02:49:37 AM
OK brains trust. I have found a crack in the frame of the 92. Can these be safely welded? It is o. The join of the bottom portion of the upper rail. Near where the foot plates bolt on.
Mate, I'm not a welder but I know a few at work. They reckon this can be welded, MIG would be best, but you could get it TIG'd. The crack seems pretty old and all the way around. Their best guess is the weld didn't lap over the two parts evenly enough and has come away. Given there's been no movement in such a long crack (you'd see 'sooting' around the crack) supports a safe to weld guess. They also said if you did weld grind back the old weld a bit and both edges to see if there is anything else wrong before welding.

But, if Diesel has already sorted you out, go for a new one!


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: ribbert on September 16, 2019, 04:09:20 AM
OK brains trust. I have found a crack in the frame of the 92. Can these be safely welded? It is o. The join of the bottom portion of the upper rail. Near where the foot plates bolt on.

............ Their best guess is the weld didn't lap over the two parts evenly enough and has come away....


Having had the chance to inspect first hand, that is also my take on it. Even though there were signs the cracks were not new, there was little evidence of movement or stress.

Pete's a welder, where are you Pete?

Noel


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: oldktmdude on September 16, 2019, 05:36:11 AM
   Weld it no problems at all. Grind, preheat and use low hydrogen electrodes or MIG. Looks as if it was not welded properly at the production line.
Get Ray to bring it down to Troys and we'll have a go at welding it up late on Saturday night. I could run a frame welding course after the usual  Manshed  :drinks: Saturday arvo drink or two.
Seriously, welding would be easy.
   Regards, Pete.


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: X-Ray on September 16, 2019, 06:27:28 AM
This trip is also going to be a getaway anniversary road trip for us, and we had not planned to go through Grafton twice, just going via inland route. If it helps Mark, and David gets his frame to Troys then we can make a detour on the way back and drop it off for you.


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: ribbert on September 16, 2019, 07:21:34 AM
Mark, having seen two of these myself, and yours makes three, I'd actually have a preference for the welded frame over one that hasn't cracked - yet!

I know it's not common and the chances of the next one blah blah blah..... but given the difficulty in getting the frame there it might be worth thinking a little more about having it welded. Even my shitty welding has lasted longer than the factory weld ever did.

Logistics aside, welding is in my opinion the better of the two options anyway.

Noel


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Troyskie on September 16, 2019, 03:23:30 PM
Mark, I'm with Noel & Pete on this. My bro had a cracked frame welded back in the late 80's (1100). That bike had about 30k on it at the time. It now has about 700k and the weld is still fine.


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Urban_Legend on September 16, 2019, 06:39:49 PM
Thank you all for your advice. I will probably get the frame repaired so I can keep the bike matching numbers. However I will still get the spare frame off Diesel Dave, just in case.

Mark


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: Millietant on September 19, 2019, 07:35:07 AM
Mark/urban Legend - if you want a lift table and have some very basic welding skills, I could send you the drawings/sketches for mine and the measurements.

It utilises a basic 2 tonne car trolley jack, but is really sturdy and stable. Let me know if you want me to send you some details. All in, I’d guess it would cost less than $100


Title: Re: PROJECT 92
Post by: ribbert on September 19, 2019, 07:52:35 AM
Mark/urban Legend - if you want a lift table and have some very basic welding skills, I could send you the drawings/sketches for mine and the measurements.

It utilises a basic 2 tonne car trolley jack, but is really sturdy and stable. Let me know if you want me to send you some details. All in, I’d guess it would cost less than $100


Dean, I was really impressed with your lift table and saved the photos intending to build one. It was the best and simplest home built unit I have seen. If you have any details, measurements etc, they would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Noel