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Author Topic: Hayabusa Dog Bones  (Read 1563 times)
Millietant
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« on: November 23, 2021, 08:27:01 PM »

A quick question on dog bones - I don’t know why but I have it in my mind that Hayabusa dog bones can be used to raise the rear of a FJ by about an inch (25mm).

Could anyone confirm that I’m either just dreaming this, or if its right/true please Huh?
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Dean

'89 FJ 1200 3CV - owned from new.
'89 FJ 1200 3CV - no engine, tank, seat....parts bike for the future.
'88 FJ 1200 3CV - became a race bike, no longer with us.
'86 FJ 1200 1TX - sold to my boss to finance the '89 3CV I still own.
fj-f3a
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« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2021, 06:10:07 AM »

Hi Dean
I do believe this is correct.
115mm between centers is the desired dimension.
This dimension gives me approx 19mm (3/4") ground to rear tyre clearance with bike on center stand.

Gavin
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Dads_FJ
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« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2021, 06:25:38 AM »

A quick question on dog bones - I don’t know why but I have it in my mind that Hayabusa dog bones can be used to raise the rear of a FJ by about an inch (25mm).

Could anyone confirm that I’m either just dreaming this, or if its right/true please Huh?

What year 'Busa?  Also What year(s) FJ?  89-90?
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John S.

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aviationfred
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« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2021, 08:46:43 AM »

These are what I use.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Soupys-FJ1200-Raising-Links-1989-1993-/183420326524?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&_trksid=p2349624.m46890.l6249&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0


Fred
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Millietant
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« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2021, 08:58:51 AM »

Thanks guys, my memory was that the first generation Busa one’s fit (1999-2007) a 3CV and give about a 25mm increase in height at the rear.

Looks like that’s the case - sadly I think put these on my bike back in about 2007 but my memory is a bit fuzzy about that time (lots of personal turmoil) - and I was also trying others and even changing dog bones on the FZ1, so I’ve lost track over the intervening period of exactly what went where, unusual for me because I usually record everything.

A friend with a 3CV is going to get a set for his bike  good2

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Dean

'89 FJ 1200 3CV - owned from new.
'89 FJ 1200 3CV - no engine, tank, seat....parts bike for the future.
'88 FJ 1200 3CV - became a race bike, no longer with us.
'86 FJ 1200 1TX - sold to my boss to finance the '89 3CV I still own.
Pat Conlon
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« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2021, 10:13:16 AM »


Caution on Soupy’s adjustable links….You MUST set the 2 links, DEAD NUTS even or you will FUBAR the needle bearings in your swing arm.
You can’t get them even when the links are installed on your bike. Get the height set where you want, then remove the links and set them even (and lock them) while they on your bench, then reinstall.

Don’t Ask how I know this….
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ribbert
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« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2021, 04:12:51 AM »



Caution on Soupy’s adjustable links….You MUST set the 2 links, DEAD NUTS even or you will FUBAR the needle bearings in your swing arm.
You can’t get them even when the links are installed on your bike. Get the height set where you want, then remove the links and set them even (and lock them) while they on your bench, then reinstall.

Don’t Ask how I know this….


I have a few misgivings about these links, including the above. I know failures are rare but I just don't like the design. I bought some years ago and after they arrived I looked at them for a while, I thought, nah!

They are also not cheap, $250 here and once an ideal ride height has been settled on, no one ever uses the adjustability feature they've just paid big bucks for again. It would be good if a loan set existed, like the shim kit, that owners could use to sort out a ride height then use the measurement to make fixed length bones for free, which is a doddle.

Noel
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red
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« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2021, 09:15:49 AM »

Caution on Soupy’s adjustable links….You MUST set the 2 links, DEAD NUTS even or you will FUBAR the needle bearings in your swing arm.
You can’t get them even when the links are installed on your bike. Get the height set where you want, then remove the links and set them even (and lock them) while they on your bench, then reinstall.  Don’t Ask how I know this….
I have a few misgivings about these links, including the above. I know failures are rare but I just don't like the design. I bought some years ago and after they arrived I looked at them for a while, I thought, nah!
They are also not cheap, $250 here and once an ideal ride height has been settled on, no one ever uses the adjustability feature they've just paid big bucks for again. It would be good if a loan set existed, like the shim kit, that owners could use to sort out a ride height then use the measurement to make fixed length bones for free, which is a doddle.
Noel
Noel,

I agree, on the issue of potential failures.  I do not know if any threaded links have failed, but from a "metals viewpoint," cracks in metal rods often start at the bottoms of threads, when threads are formed by CUTTING on a shaft.  I know the aircraft standard is rolled-on threading, as you would form threads by hand on a rod of clay.  It's a hot-metal process, on new aircraft bolts.  I do recommend using the threaded links to get the length you want correct, and maybe with a test-ride to verify the length, but then fabricating one-piece links to that length for normal everyday use.

My US$.02 worth . . .
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Cheers,
Red

P.S. Life is too short, and health is too valuable, to ride on cheap parade-duty tires.
andyoutandabout
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« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2021, 11:35:18 AM »

Thanks for the reboot of this subject, which I remember being discussed way back, but couldn't remember the 'magic' 115mm measurement.
Anyway, I suspect that will do for most, but I do like Pat's previous idea of putting the bike on the center stand, placing a bit of 3/4 wood under the tyre, measuring the dog bone gap and making them.
I'm sure with all the different suspension units, the measurements are thrown out a bit.
I'm think of a YSS or Hagon rear shock for my 1991, so I'll be going through these calculations at some point.
Surely these are an easy thing to make?? Or am I over simplifying. Seem to also remember that one forum member was successful and once you've made one set, the second set is a walk in the park.
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andyoutandabout
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« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2021, 11:38:16 AM »

Just reread this thread and noted Millitant was asking about a 3CV.
My 1991 is a 3XW
The plot thickens
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andyoutandabout
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« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2021, 11:42:39 AM »

https://www.ebay.com/itm/113552676302?chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-117182-37290-0&mkcid=2&itemid=113552676302&targetid=1263433204014&device=c&mktype=&googleloc=9032022&poi=&campaignid=14859008593&mkgroupid=130497710760&rlsatarget=pla-1263433204014&abcId=9300678&merchantid=137686866&gclid=Cj0KCQiA7oyNBhDiARIsADtGRZa_G9egWM0otnpFdsxlWK5eveF_-ZFY5SsN3p8Q3wnc1LqHSJMEQ0MaAuwpEALw_wcB

Then there is this
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Millietant
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« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2021, 06:35:54 AM »

There is Andy, but you don't want to be fitting Hayabusa dog bones which will jack up a Busa by 25 mm - that'd mean you'd need a set of ladders to get on your FJ - standard Busa dog bones already lift the FJ rear somewhere around 20mm I reckon.
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Dean

'89 FJ 1200 3CV - owned from new.
'89 FJ 1200 3CV - no engine, tank, seat....parts bike for the future.
'88 FJ 1200 3CV - became a race bike, no longer with us.
'86 FJ 1200 1TX - sold to my boss to finance the '89 3CV I still own.
ribbert
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« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2021, 06:40:29 AM »


Surely these are an easy thing to make?? Or am I over simplifying.


According to the previous post, yes they are and no, you're not.

In fact there is no reason for them to even be 'bone' shaped, as shown below, this makes DIY fabrication even easier.




These bones have already done well over 150k without issue, the rear suspension on this bike has a very hard life and a recent inspection showed no wear at all.

The only critical aspect of making them yourself is that the holes are equidistant, the metal thick enough and that sufficient material is left around the holes. Accurately drilling the holes can be done by clamping, or in this owners case, tacking the links together until the holes are drilled, these particular ones were made from scrap lying around the garage.

There is definitely a sweet spot where the handling benefits the most and as some here have discovered, just because a little bit's good does not translate to more must be better.

This mod also makes the bike easier to lift/roll onto the centre stand.

Noel
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« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2021, 09:13:32 AM »


Surely these are an easy thing to make?? Or am I over simplifying.


According to the previous post, yes they are and no, you're not.

In fact there is no reason for them to even be 'bone' shaped, as shown below, this makes DIY fabrication even easier.




These bones have already done well over 150k without issue, the rear suspension on this bike has a very hard life and a recent inspection showed no wear at all.

The only critical aspect of making them yourself is that the holes are equidistant, the metal thick enough and that sufficient material is left around the holes. Accurately drilling the holes can be done by clamping, or in this owners case, tacking the links together until the holes are drilled, these particular ones were made from scrap lying around the garage.

There is definitely a sweet spot where the handling benefits the most and as some here have discovered, just because a little bit's good does not translate to more must be better.

This mod also makes the bike easier to lift/roll onto the centre stand.

Noel


Noel,
Are those made from stainless steel?  Also what thickness did you choose?

Looks like your Metz 01 is holding up well too!

Thanks,
J
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John S.

'84 Yamaha FJ1100
'89 Yamaha FJ1200
'92 Yamaha TDM850
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'77 Yamaha IT175(D)
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« Reply #14 on: November 30, 2021, 05:41:05 AM »


Noel,
Are those made from stainless steel?  Also what thickness did you choose?

Looks like your Metz 01 is holding up well too!

Thanks,
J


John, the links are 6 mm mild steel.

Yes, the 01's are great, I did a bit of a write up on them a week or so back and have just fitted the SE version after seeing if there was anything any better out yet.

This is how much I like them...



Noel
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"Tell a wise man something he doesn't know and he'll thank you, tell a fool something he doesn't know and he'll abuse you”
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